fame

What They Voted For: Corruption & Special Interest

#trumpswindle | #WhatTheyVotedFor

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump looks at a sheet of notes and talking points as he speaks during a rally in Eugene, Oregon, 6 May 2016. (Photo by Ted S. Warren/AP)

Who: Steve Benen (msnbc)
What: “Trump presents a new, twisted version of ‘populism'”
When: 11 November 2016

Steve Benen offers something of an obvious point:

The president-elect has effectively cornered the market on the former. Rhetorically, Trump is A Man of the People, railing against the established order. The elites have run roughshod over the interests of everyday Americans for too long, the billionaire celebrity told voters, and it was time the electorate overturn the corrupt system by electing Donald J. Trump, a champion of those overlooked taxpayers who’ve been left behind.

Trump, in other words, has a populist style. He adopted a populist tone. The more Trump railed against the elites, the more the media characterized him as a populist, and the more his fans swooned.

But then there’s actual populism, which is based on policies and proposals that advance the interests of working people. Real populists may struggle at times with style and tone, but they nevertheless fight for opportunities for those without, not those who are already members of the elite.

And if you mistook Trump as someone who believes in actual populism, I’m afraid he fooled you.

President-elect Donald J. Trump, who campaigned against the corrupt power of special interests, is filling his transition team with some of the very sort of people who he has complained have too much clout in Washington: corporate consultants and lobbyists. […]

Mr. Trump was swept to power in large part by white working-class voters who responded to his vow to restore the voices of forgotten people, ones drowned out by big business and Wall Street. But in his transition to power, some of the most prominent voices will be those of advisers who come from the same industries for which they are being asked to help set the regulatory groundwork.

(more…)

Something About Adam’s Butt

Composite includes detail of 'Bug Martini' by Adam Huber, 24 August 2015.  'Bug Martini' and Bug Martini logo are drawn by Adam Huber, and presumably thus copyrighted.

For the puns on the buns this one’s got no good runs for the big guns rockin’ in a title really idle for the teevee something something oh Jesus God why are you letting me carry on like this?

There isn’t a frame in this one that isn’t … well … okay, Uncle Sam Bug kicking bug-ass isn’t exactly creepy, but as we’re fond of saying around here, it all goes downhill from there.

Don’t blame Adam; make him famous.

The fourth panel is worth a Nerd Bug that doesn’t know how to keep his damn mouth shut, too. Really. All that and a bag o’shivers, too.

____________________

Huber, Adam. “Have Buns – Will Travel”. Bug Martini. 24 August 2015.

Unnerving

One of the jokes I have forsaken in recent years, mostly for the benefit of people who seem unable to take such lines in any reasonably figurative sense, is that some things ought to be illegal. It is, in fact, a long-known joke among men. It ought to be illegal to be so obese while wearing such tight clothes; to be so “hot” a woman and yet be related; and so on. One would think that a certain liberty of humor is inherent in any statement that says it ought to be illegal to be a milf if you happen to be my mother.

But then there are some absurdities that simply fit the pretense: Some things ought to be illegal. Like Sarah Palin.

Of course, some people might take such a joke seriously, that one really does think Sarah Palin ought to be arrested or, perhaps more efficiently, shot: It ought to be illegal to be so f@cking stupid ….

But, then again, sometimes we come to that point where the line really is blurred. Dennis Rodman’s hair? Paris Hilton, in general? Anyone named Spelling ever again producing a television series? One could always joke, and others could reasonably, given circumstantial atmosphere or context, take seriously the proposition that any of those things ought to be illegal.

Thus prefaced, and disclaimed according to the proposition that, as I had to live through it, so do you:

Zsa Zsa Gabor has always been associated with glamour in Hollywood — queen of film and television over the course of a five-decade career, married nine times, and even able to parlay a famous slap of a police officer into a career revival. In fact, the Huffington Post recently called her “the first and probably biggest Hollywood celeb to become famous for being famous.” Aptly put.

But when does pursuing fame cross the line for a 94-year old? That point may have come this week, when her husband of 25 years told CNN that he had started the process of donor matching and blood work so he could turn Zsa Zsa into Ma Ma.

That’s right, the esteemed Prince Frederic von Anhalt is planning to arrange for an egg donor, surrogate mother, and artificial insemination to allow Zsa Zsa to once again enjoy the wonder of motherhood.

Really, it must be nice to be so rich as to afford any manner of insanity in the name of believing you are in love, but some things ought to be illegal.